BERÄTTELSENS

UTVECKLING


1. DEN VANLIGA VÄRLDEN
2. ROPET PÅ ÄVENTYR
3. VÄGRAN ATT DELTA I ÄVENTYRET
4. MÖTET MED EN MENTOR
5. FÖRSTA TRÖSKELN
6. PRÖVNINGAR, VÄNNER OCH FIENDER
7. INGÅNGEN TILL DEN INNERSTA GROTTAN
8. DEN STÖRSTA UTMANINGEN
9. BELÖNING
10. VÄGEN TILLBAKA
11. ÅTERUPPTÅNDELSE
12. KOMMA TILLBAKA MED ELIXIRET

PERSONFUNKTIONER:

HUVUDPERSON/HJÄLTE
MENTOR
FIENDER
SKUGGOR
FORMSKIFTARE
TRICKSARE, CLOWNER
BUDBÄRARE
VÄNNER
VÄKTARE VID TRÖSKLARNA
SYMBOLISKA SAKER
SYMBOLISKA DJUR

STEG ELVA: ÅTERUPPSTÅNDELSE

"What can I do old man? I'm dead, aren't I?'
from The Third Man by Graham Greene

Nu kommer det svåraste steget för de flesta berättare och de flesta berättelser. Många berättelser slutar med den stora kampen och en kort scen av glädje som belöning. Men för att en berättelse ska bli komplett och kännas mogen behöver läsaren, tittaren, upplev ytterligare en död och återfödelse hos hjälten, lik den stora som redan skett men ändå någonting annat.

Detta är berättelsens verkliga klimax, inte den farliga och stora utmaningen eller kampen som vi mötte på steg åtta. Hjältinnan eller hjälten måste genomgå en sista rening innan hon eller han kan återvända till den vanliga världen.De måste genomgå en sista förändring. Tricket för manusförfattarna är att visa hur denna förändring ser ut i personernas karaktärer, i deras beteende och inte bara i hur de pratar. Författarna måste visa oss att huvudpersonerna verkligen har återuppstått.

Fråga: På vad sätt har huvudpersonen förändrats i den berättelse du analyserar?
 

ÅTERUPPSTÅNDELSE

EN NY PERSONLIGHET

Ett nytt jag måste skapas för den nya världen. Just som hjälten måste kasta av sig sina gamla själv för att komma in i den speciella världen, måste hon eller han nu skapa en ny för att komma tillbaka.Denna nya person ska ha det bästa i den gamla personen men också de nya insikter som gjorts i kampen.

Fråga: På vilket sätt har din huvudperson en ny personlighet?

In the Western Barbarossa, Gary Buseys farmboy character goes through a final ordeal from which he is reborn as the new Barbarossa, having incorporated the lessons of his Mentor, Willie Nelson, along the way. John Wayne emerges from the ordeal of death in Fort Apache and incorporates some of the dress and attitudes of his antagonist, Henry Fonda.
 

CLEANSING

One function of Resurrection is to cleanse heroes of the smell of death, yet help them retain the lessons of the ordeal. The lack of public ceremonies and counseling for returning Vietnam War veterans may have contributed to the terrible problems these soldiers have had in reintegrating with society. So-called primitive societies seem better prepared to handle the return of heroes. They provide rituals to purge the blood and death from hunters and warriors so they can become peaceful members of society again.

Returning hunters may be quarantined safely away from the tribe for a period of time. To reintegrate hunters and warriors into the tribe, shamans use rituals that mimic the effects of death or even take the participants to deaths door. The hunters or warriors may be buried alive for a period of time or confined in a cave or sweat lodge, symbolically growing in the womb of the earth. Then they are raised up (Resurrected) and welcomed as newborn members of the tribe.

Q: Is your hero returning to "his tribe"? How is he welcomed?

Sacred architecture aims to create this feeling of Resurrection, by confining worshippers in a narrow, dark hall or tunnel, like a birth canal, before bringing them out into an open, well-lit area, with a corresponding lift of relief Baptism by immersion in a stream is a ritual designed to give the Resurrection feeling, both cleansing the sinner and reviving him from symbolic death by drowning.

TWO GREAT ORDEALS

Why do so many stories seem to have two climaxes or death-and- rebirth ordeals, one near the middle and another just before the end of the story? The college semester metaphor suggests the reason. The central crisis or Supreme Ordeal is like a midterm exam; the Resurrection is the final exam.

Q: What are the two ordeals in your story?

Heroes must be tested one last time to see if they retained the learning from the Supreme Ordeal of Act Two. To learn something in a Special World is one thing; to bring the knowledge home as applied wisdom is quite another. Students can cram for a test but the Resurrection stage represents a field trial of a hero's new skills, in the real world. lt's both a reminder of death and a test of the heros learning. Was the hero sincere about change? Will she backslide or fail, be defeated by neuroses or a Shadow at the eleventh hour? Will the dire predictions made about hero Joan Wilder in Act One of Romancing the Stone  ("You're not up to this, Joan, and you know it,") turn out to be true?
 

PHYSICAL ORDEAL

At the simplest level, the Resurrection may just be a hero facing death one last time in an ordeal, battie, or showdown. lt's often the final, decisive confrontation with the villain or Shadow.

But the difference between this and previous meetings with death is that the danger is usually On the broadest scale of the entire story The threat is not just to the hero, but to the whole world. In other words, the stakes are at their highest.

Q: What threats can you identify in the story you work with?

The James Bond movics often climax with 007 battling the villains and then racing against time and impossible odds to disarm some Doomsday device, such as the atomic bomb at the climax of Goldfinger. Millions of lives are at stake. Hero, audience, and world are taken right to the brink of death one more time before Bond manages to yank the right wire and save us all from destruction.
 

THE ACTIVE HERO

It seems obvious that the hero should be the one to act in this climactic moment. But many writers make the mistake of having hero rescued from death by a timely intervention from an Ally - equivalent of the cavalry coming to save the day. Heroes can get surprise assistance, but its best for the hero to be the one to perform the decisive action; to deliver the death blow to fear or the Shadow, to be active rather than passive, at this of all times.

Q: Is your hero an active one? What does he/she do?
 

SHOWDOWNS

In Westerns, crime fiction, and many action films, the Resurrection expressed as the biggest confrontation and battle of the story, the showdown or shootout. A showdown pits hero and villains in an ultimate contest with the highest possible stakes, life and death. ICs the ciassic gunfight of the Western, the swordfight of the swashbuckler, or the last acrobatic battle of a martial arts movie. It may even be a courtroom showdown or an emotional "shootout" in a domestic drama.

The showdown is a distinct dramatic form with is own rules and conventions. The operatic climaxes of the Sergio Leone "spaghetti-westerns exaggerate the elements of the conventional showdown: the dramatic music; the opposing forces marching towards each other in some kind of arena (the town street, a corral, a cemetery, the villains hideout); the closeups of guns, hands, and eyes poised for the decisive moment; the sense that time stands still.

Q: Does your story has this kind of showdown? How?

DEATH AND REBIRTH OF TRAGIC HEROES

Usually heroes survive this brush with death and are resurrected. Often it is the villains who die or are defeated, but some tragic heroes actually die at this point, like the doorned heroes of They Died With Their Boots On, The Sand Pebbles, Charge of the Light Brigade or Glory.

Q: Does your hero die at the showdown?

In Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid the heroes are cornered in an adobe building, surrounded and outnumbered. They run out to face death in a climax that is delayed to the final seconds of the film. The chances are good they're going to die in a hail of bullets, but they'll go down fighting and are granted immortality by a final freeze- frame, which makes them live on in our memories. In The Wild Bunch the heroes are elaborately killed, but their energy lives on in a gun which is picked up by another adventurer who wc know will carry on in their wild style.

CHOICE

Another possibility for a Resurrection moment may be a climactic choice among options that indicates whether or not the hero has truly learned the lesson of change. A difficult choice tests a hero's values: Will he choose in accordance with his old, flawed ways, or will the choice refleet the new person he's become? In Witness, policeman John Book comes to a final showdown with his ultimate enemy, a crooked police official. The Amish people watch to see if Book will follow the violent code of his Ordinary World or the peaceful way he has learned in the Special World of the Amish.

Q: Is your hero facing such a choice as a way to resurrection?
 
 
 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 

12. RETURN WITH THE ELIXIR
 

CAST:

HERO
MENTOR
SHADOWS
SHAPESHIFTER
TRICKSTER, CLOWN
HERALD
ALLIES
THRESHOLD GUARDIANS
SYMBOLIC THINGS
SYMBOLIC ANIMALS



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

    Epost: humlebo@iname.com